Other Advanced Institutions

ADVANCE at Northeastern University

Northeastern University is a National Science Foundation funded ADVANCE Institutional Transformation site. This site's theme is to advance women in interdisciplinary and international networks. This 5-year institutional program is closely aligned with Northeastern's move toward interdisciplinary scholarship and increased global engagement. The Northeastern ADVANCE Program reports to the Office of the Provost.

Three primary focus areas are addressed:

(1) The recruitment of women into academic positions of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as the social sciences. Recruitment efforts have a particular focus on the recruitment of women of color.

(2) The retention and the advancement of women faculty in our participating departments through a number of programs and activities designed to grow and develop networks, increase collaborative opportunities, and to ensure that Northeastern faculty have the information needed to make the best career decisions.

(3) The engagement of leadership in ADVANCE initiatives and efforts. A series of activities to increase awareness amongst academic leaders and to prepare rising leaders for future administrative or research leadership positions.

ADVANCE at Rice University

Rice University's NSF ADVANCE Program is designed to capitalize on the strong commitment to gender equity at the University, and to create new insights into the features of the academy that impede the inclusion and progress of women and minorities more generally in the professoriate. Our hope is that more women and underrepresented minorities will be inspired to join the ranks of academe and to use their own skills to advance into important leadership roles based on the activities of this program.

ADVANCE Nebraska

America’s future prosperity requires talented men and women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln endorses the vital goal of recruiting, retaining, and promoting more women in STEM fields because:

  • To grow Nebraska’s economy and compete for talented workers, UNL must support all potential and existing employees.
  • Having women faculty attracts more women students into STEM fields.
  • A competitive UNL creates a workplace that welcomes and supports all potential faculty regardless of gender.
  • National funding agencies require and reward diverse research teams and efforts to reach diverse student and general populations.
  • The quality of research and creative solutions are enriched by diverse views, perspectives, and critical analyses.

Brown University

ADVANCE Program at Brown University

Funded by a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation, the ADVANCE Program at Brown University seeks to increase the retention and advancement of women faculty in science and engineering by making available those mechanisms that promote career success for all faculty scientists—mechanisms including mentoring, grant-seeking support, and tools for becoming leaders in academic and scientific communities. We also strive to transform the institution by utilizing the social science literature on gender equity in resources provided to department chairs and administrators in order to ensure the retention and advancement of women and minority scientists. ADVANCE at Brown awards grants for research and professional development, sponsors seminars and public lectures, provides grant librarian support, as well as networking opportunities that seek to foster faculty success.

Cal Poly Pomona

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP) will create recruitment, retention and professional development systems to help diverse faculty, including women, in STEM disciplines to advance to leadership positions.  Activities are proposed in four areas:

1)  Institutional Development/Sustainability: Develop and institutionalize processes for attracting, retaining and advancing diverse faculty in STEM disciplines.  Activities include creating a Provost’s Advisory Committee, creating assessment tools and dissemination mechanisms to share with other institutions, appointing ADVANCE Scholars, and developing information resources.

2)  Recruitment: Improve recruitment efforts for a diverse STEM faculty, including women and under-represented minorities.  Activities include improving recruitment and search processes and training search committees, developing a local employment network to assist with partner placement, and establishing partnerships with minority-serving institutions to encourage graduate students to pursue teaching in the CSU.

3)  Career Development: Assist diverse STEM faculty to advance in their careers by enhancing the RTP process. Activities include developing training workshops for RTP committees, providing systematic pre-tenure performance feedback; establishing professional learning communities; and facilitating faculty development in teaching, research and service.

4)  Leadership Development: Encourage diverse STEM faculty involvement in decisions and policy development.  Activities include mentoring, leadership internships, and developing multiple paths to leadership.

INTELLECTAL MERIT: Many of the strategies have not been tried at a primarily teaching university where the needs of the faculty are significantly different than that of a research university.  Features of this project that will add knowledge about advancing diverse STEM faculty in academia are collaboration with minority-serving institutions to recruit faculty, transformation of RTP into a learning process; and a broad definition of leadership that allows faculty to develop according to their own interests.

BROADER IMPACTS: This project will increase the diversity of STEM faculty at Cal Poly Pomona, including women and under-represented minorities.  Strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness so successful approaches can be disseminated and replicated. The project will promote teaching and research by actively working to attract and tenure talented STEM faculty and will enhance partnerships through collaboration with minority-serving institutions.

ISU ADVANCE

The ISU ADVANCE Program is supported by the National Science Foundation through an ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Award. The ISU ADVANCE Program is funded for 5 years (2006-2011).

The goal of the ISU ADVANCE Program is to investigate the effectiveness of a multilevel collaborative effort to produce institutional transformation that results in the full participation of women faculty in science, technology, engineering and math fields in the university.

Northeastern University ADVANCE

Northeastern University is a National Science Foundation funded ADVANCE Institutional Transformation site. This site's theme is to advance women in interdisciplinary and international networks. This 5-year institutional program is closely aligned with Northeastern's move toward interdisciplinary scholarship and increased global engagement. The Northeastern ADVANCE Program reports to the Office of the Provost.

Three primary focus areas are addressed:

(1) The recruitment of women into academic positions of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as the social sciences. Recruitment efforts have a particular focus on the recruitment of women of color.

(2) The retention and the advancement of women faculty in our participating departments through a number of programs and activities designed to grow and develop networks, increase collaborative opportunities, and to ensure that Northeastern faculty have the information needed to make the best career decisions.

(3) The engagement of leadership in ADVANCE initiatives and efforts. A series of activities to increase awareness amongst academic leaders and to prepare rising leaders for future administrative or research leadership positions.

University of Michigan ADVANCE

The University of Michigan ADVANCE Program aims to improve the campus environment for faculty in four general areas:

  • Recruitment: development and use of equitable faculty recruiting practices
  • Retention: preemptive strategies to prevent the loss of valued faculty
  • Climate: improvement of departmental climate for faculty, staff and students
  • Leadership: development of leadership skills that allow academic leaders to encourage positive departmental climates
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